They are experts at whipping up delectable dishes and delightful four-course meals for guests who dine at their restaurants. Chefs are often interviewed about their cuisine of specialisation, their signature dishes and their preferred comfort meal at the end of the day after 12 to16 hours in the kitchen. But what are these gourmet experts eating while they are preparing food for others? Is it something just as fancy or something simpler? Read on to find out.
Advertisement

They are experts at whipping up delectable dishes and delightful four-course meals for guests who dine at their restaurants. Chefs are often interviewed about their cuisine of specialisation, their signature dishes and their preferred comfort meal at the end of the day after 12 to16 hours in the kitchen. But what are these gourmet experts eating while they are preparing food for others? Is it something just as fancy or something simpler? Read on to find out.

1. The Green Tea Chugger
Ranveer Brar: “When it comes to my meals, I am a very boring man. I typically start my day with a whole bunch of seasonal fruits and definitely an apple. I firmly believe in the philosophy: ‘An apple a day keeps the doctor away’. At my restaurant, my lunch is consistently chicken or shrimp dimsums, but if I am in the mood to indulge, I feast on a fat piece of salmon. But I am more disciplined with my dinner, which is repeatedly khichdi with ghee—there is no compromise on that on a working day. Otherwise, through the day I sip green tea, and chug down at least 10 cups a day. All other hunger pangs are taken care of by the frequent tasting in the kitchen.”

2. Flirting With Simplicity
Vicky Ratnani: “I believe that if you cook fancy, you end up eating simple. My lunch is always home-cooked—rice, dal, chapatti, veggies and a salad—that I pack and carry with me to work. If I am hungry through the day, I snack on fruits and unsalted nuts. A little secret: I could live off sandwiches. Light ones with lettuce, chicken, tomatoes enveloped in brown bread. I usually eat that for dinner, else khichdi. If I have time at hand and wish to eat a complete meal, I quickly rustle up a rice-with-veggies concoction or stir-fried noodles or pasta. I, also, occasionally enjoy an egg-white-bhurji-and-veggies combo, topped with chillies, cheese and coriander, at work.”

3. Work, Eat Khichdi, Sleep, Repeat
Pankaj Bhadouria: “My day begins early as I need to make breakfast for my kids and pack their lunch. After a heavy breakfast at home with my family, my first full meal at work is the staff lunch at 2pm. Till then I am tasting dishes almost every hour. These lunches are prepared under my supervision and alternate between toovar dal, rajma, channa dal, kadhi, always served with rice, chapatti and a seasonal vegetable, but a dal is a must. Sometimes, even a chowmein and Manchurian gravy is whipped up. After samplin

4. Eat Quinoa And Prosper
Ripudaman Handa: “I start my day with muesli and low fat milk and a plate of mixed fruits or a white omelette with multigrain bread. I reach my restaurant at noon and take my daily dose of protein shake. I gorge on lunch around 3pm, which is mostly pesto chicken with quinoa salad, and that’s my last complete meal of the day. I am, of course, tasting every dish that is served at my restaurant and that fills my tummy. But I try to drink a cup of black coffee, along with an oatmeal cookie around 5pm for energy to power through the long shift.”

Advertisement

5. Beat The Carb Out of Diet
Nachiket Shetye: “Earlier, people would call me the ‘large and angry chef’, but trust me I was only large. But since I committed to my no-carb diet, I have been fitter. I eat small meals every couple of hours and I only cheat on my diet when I dine out because I want to try out the restaurant’s specials. At 9am, I start my day with a fruit (apple or banana), followed by oatmeal muesli and curd at 11am. At 1pm, I eat a healthy salad. Since I am now experimenting with indigenous ingredients in the kitchen, such as jowar, bajra and puffed grains, I add this to my salad. At 3pm I always, always eat a bowl of dal (I have a fondness for dal) and some grilled veggies. Two hours later, I eat some fruit or boiled sprouts tossed with some spices, perhaps a five-spice powder, miso or gochujang paste. My last meal of the day is a protein, so either grilled chicken or fish with veggies. At the end of the day, I crave for something sweet, which is thanks to my wife who has a sweet tooth. So we both share some chocolate.”

6. Eat Dal And Save The World
Kunal Kapur: “I think it’s reverse psychology. While you cook exotic or extravagant food in your restaurant, you actually end up eating simple, yet tasty food on the side. Earlier, I used to pack lunch from home. My favourite vegetable is bitter gourd or karela, so that would be a regular in my lunch dabba. But now, I eat the staff meal at the kitchen, which has become more of a sacred practice. I relish the yellow dal, meat, veggies and chapatti. If I am crunched for time, I make sure I eat a bowl of yellow dal at least.”

7. The Spicy Chocolatier
Varun Inamdar: “Since I am in the business of chocolate, by default I always have chocolates in my bag so I munch on that when I am hungry. But if I am at a shoot or at a consultation, I opt for a soup because it can be instantly churned out, it’s power-packed, nutritious, wholesome and quick and easy to eat. I rarely pack food from home. If I am lucky to get time to sit down and eat a proper meal at work, I prefer a BLT sandwich. The other advantage of having a soup, and a spicy one at that, after eating plenty of dessert is that it clears your palette and washes down any buttery, sweet and creamy trails from your mouth, thereby whetting your appetite for more chocolate after the break.”

8. Eat Right on Time
Rakhee Vaswani: “I eat out twice a week, but on other days, 90% of the time, I’m punctual with my meals. When I am at work, just before lunch, I drink a glass of hot water as this increases my body temperature, which therefore increases my metabolic rate and allows my body to burn more calories throughout. Lunch comprises one bran roti with green leafy vegetables along with cucumber, or kollam rice with tori. I drink a glass of hot water and a cup of green tea post lunch. In the evening, I either eat a bowl of makhana or bhel or a vegetable sandwich, followed by a cup of green tea. Dinner is a simple soup and grilled chicken or kollam rice and dal or oats ka chilla. I call it a day with two prunes.”

9. Queen of Simple Town
Shipra Khanna: “As a major chunk of my day is devoted to cooking and tasting, there is no check on my calorie intake. So, this calls for strictly monitoring my diet at other times. I eat simple to remain fit. I eat multigrain bread sandwiches with vegetables or eggs, plenty of fruits and fresh juices. But my comfort meal is rice, dal, vegetables and yogurt—simple, healthy and satisfying.”

Related Stories

To feed your hunger for more

Advertisement

Categories

Try this appetizing doughnut recipe, which is made with peanut butter and glazed with...